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RM INSPIRATION : EDUARDO TERRAZAS

Hello, welcome back to another blog post! In anticipation of our upcoming relaunch in 2024, I thought I’d tell you about one of our inspiration starting points for this new collection –  let me reiterate 'starting points'– even the research for a collection can take many twists and turns, and we're ending up with something quite different, but the origins are fundamental.  . (Click on highlighted words for links to extra info!) . So, let's take a look at on of our early inspirations– Eduardo Terrazas... . Eduardo Terrazas (born 1936, Guadalajara, Mexico)– is a Mexican contemporary artist who knows no bounds with colour, shape and composition– was the perfect starting point to get me into the spirit!    Surprisingly, I only...

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TEXTILE INSIGHT PT 2: THE BROCADE WEAVE OF ZINACANTÁN & THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MAGDALENA DRESS.

"...I was tempted by their cross-stitch embroidery, but it was simply too time-consuming and expensive to start the project with.  I was also tempted by the 'deshilado' technique (see pictures below).   But it was their brocade technique that really got me excited, layered and slick patterns in raised textures over stripes- vibrant colours and what was most surprising was the clean finish!"

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TEXTILE INSIGHT 1:  THE GAUZE WEAVE of VENUSTIANO CARRANZA

Welcome to our new Textile Insight series, giving you some real insight and history behind the development of our textiles!   The narrative behind every one of our pieces and fabrics is so rich that we'd like to share it with you.  So, fiirst up is the gauze weave of Venustiano Carranza, which has given life to our Carmen Smock Dress and the Paraíso Night Set! THE BEGINNING My love affair with the gauze weave from Venustiano Carranza dates back to 2015 when I visited the Museum of Mayan Textiles & Costume in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas. I had spent hours observing every single garment and textile in awe from different Mayan regions of Mexico and Guatemala, all fascinating, most of which were...

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